Super Easy Crock Pot Thai Peanut Chicken Thighs

When we had those single digit days just before the storm I had some chicken thighs but I wasn’t about to try to be outdoors manning the grill so I tried chicken thighs in the crock pot (well the crock pot and other things).

First I cooked a pound of bacon for breakfast for the family and left the bacon fat in the pan on the stove.

Then I pat dry all the chicken thighs with paper towels and lightly seasoned them with salt and pepper.

Next tossed them a couple of minutes on each side in the pan of bacon fat to crisp up the skin.

After that I chopped up a couple of cloves of garlic and put the chicken thighs in the bottom of the crock pot and again seasoned with salt pepper and tossed in teh garlic and then covered with store bought Thai Peanut sauce.

No braising liquid is needed as the chicken thighs throw plenty of fat as it renders down.

I also had a couple of strips of bacon left over from earlier so I placed them on top of two of the thighs.

On high for 3 hours.

Next remove and place on a foiled cookie sheet and under the broiler for three minutes to crisp up the skin.

Absolutely delicious and incredibly juicy!

Recipe: Garlicky Butter Shrimp On The @WeberGrills Q

Shrimp were on sale at East Gloucester Stop and Shop and I was in the mood for something light after smashing down a decadent steak sandwich for lunch.

Kate whipped up a salad and I was in charge of the shrimp.

One of the things about grilling shrimp is you want them pretty dry like the way you want chicken so you can get that char on the outside without drying out the inside.

So I treat them the same way patting the meat (shrimp) dry with a paper towel while preparing the marinade.

The marinade?  Very simple- a half a stick of buttah melted in the microwave, a couple of turns of EVOO, salt, pepper and three heads of minced garlic.

Mixed the marinade ingredients together and tossed the patted down shrimp in to soak for a bit.

Grill on high to preheat, grates seasoned with cooking spray and then to skewer the shrimp.

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I like to raft the meat so it doesn’t spin on the skewers.  This way when you flip them they flip all at once.

On Kate’s she asked for the Paul Prudhomme Blackened Fish Rub.  I went with the McKormick’s Gruillmates Mesquite.

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The Weber Q1200 is perfect for getting home from work and wanting to do a quick cook.

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A couple of minutes per side and a garlic butter mop on each turn to keep them moist is all it took.

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Kate mixed up a fantastic salad.  I dressed it with Briannas Home Style Dressings Blush Wine Vinaigrette.

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This is the seasoning we used for Kate’s –

Purchase here-Magic Seasoning, Blackened Redfish Magic 24 oz

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And my new go-to McCormick Grill Mates Grill Mates Mesquite Seasoning, 24 oz

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The Charcoal @WeberGrills Go-Anywhere- Theorizing The Evolution Of Portable Charcoal Grilling From The Cast Iron Hibachi

The Weber Go-Anywhere has been around for a while.

Read this excellent post detailing the history of the Go-Anywhere on the Weber Kettle Club Website-

Weber GO Anywhere History

 

This history article was researched and put together by Weber Kettle Club forum member Neil_VT00

 

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If you look at the timeline, the rectangular portable Go-Anywhere was introduced in 1979 and not a whole lot has changed since then.

What I think is genius about it and how it advanced portable charcoal cooking was how it differentiated from the popularity of the open cast iron hibachi.

Cast iron hibachis were popular in the 60s.  They are heavy, they require maintenance to avoid rusting and they are open topped which limits the type of cooking to direct grilling.

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My guess is that the engineers that designed the Weber Charcoal Go-Anywhere took on all of these issues by making it out of their porcelain coated steel to avoid rust issues and be a whole lot lighter to transport.

The Lodge Sportsman Cast Iron Grill has roots dating back to 1941.  It’s heavy, it requires maintenance to keep from rusting and again, it does not have a lid.

I’m not saying they are not interesting or fun to cook on.  I’m just saying the Weber Go-Anywhere is a whole lot more versatile.

When you light up a bunch of coals on an open hibachi you need to be cognizant of factors such as wind and how much time you have. The coals don’t get snuffed out quickly as there is not lid or vents to regulate air needed to sustain the coals being lit.

Here’s my Lodge Sportsman grill/hibachi on action at the dock-

On the Go-Anywhere the legs flip up and lock the vented lid to the base making it easy to transport.  It can also be used to smoke on a small scale and regulate air flow with the vents on the bottom and in the lid.  With a traditional hibachi you’re pretty much limited to open grilling.

Here are a couple of the other cast iron hibachis that I’ve collected-

Queen Hibachi Japan

Cast Iron Bull Hibachi

BBQ Accessory Review: Chicken Thigh Satay On The @WeberGrills Q Using Charcoal Companion Raft Skewers

Got home on the later side last night and was famished.

Sliced up some skinless/boneless chicken thighs into strips, dredged them in my favorite peanut sauce and skewered them for a quick cook.   I prefer boneless/skinless thighs over the tenders or breast because it’s juicier and cheaper 9 times out of 10.

Note the dual prong skewers.  I’m not a fan of single prong skewers because your meat or vegetables spin around when you try to flip the skewer.  These raft skewers are way easier to handle and keep your food from flopping around and are only $7.32 on Amazon for a set of 4.  Link to purchase here

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I love this  peanut sauce.  You can order it online-

House Of Tsang Bangkok Peanut Sauce

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Beer Can Chicken Is Pretty Damn Easy

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Took the chicken out of the package, quick rinse and pat dry with paper towels followed by a spritz of olive oil and dusting of McCormick Montreal Chicken Seasoning.

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The reservoir at the bottom of the stand holds about a half a can of beer.

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Some foil underneath to catch drippings.  A full chimney of lit charcoal in Weber charcoal baskets split on opposite sides of the charcoal grate with the foil liner in between.  Chicken standing up in the middle between the baskets.

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Vents wide open.  Totate chicken 90 degrees after 30 minutes.  It’s done when the chicken reaches an internal temp of 145 degrees in the thick part of the breast.

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Twice Smoked Carando Spiral Sliced Ham On The @WeberGrills 22

When $4.99 Carando Spiral Sliced Ham is on sale for .99/ lb you buy first, figure out how to smoke it later.

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Might have been the easiest thing I’ve ever smoked on the @webergrills 22 inch kettle.

Took it out of the package, glazed it with a mix of Coca Cola and honey and rubbed it with a Turbinado/Brown Sugar mix.

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Smoked at 275 for three hours til 135 internal temp, spritzing with the glaze every half hour.

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Easy peasy and delicious! #carando #weber #bbq #barbeque @_rublife_ @anotherpintplease @weberkettleclub @bbqitshow

Vintage Cast Iron Bull Hibachi /Brazier Unboxing Video

1971 David Kamenstein Inc Taiwan Is The Stamp In The Cast Iron.

It’s got no rust but needs a good cleaning from dust. Must have been in someone’s closet or basement for a long while.

Humphrey’s Searing Station Demo With Craig Kimberley

Craig and I visit Humphrey’s Smokers Manufacturing plant to pick up his customized searing station.

To order one for yourself check out the Humphrey’s website here-

https://www.humphreysbbq.com/

 

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