Fourth Of July Charcoal Sales

 

There are three charcoal sales that you can pretty much count on year after year.  Memorial Day, Fourth of July and Labor Day.  These sales generally produce 50% off sales and if you even grill 1/4 of the times I do, it’s worth it to stock up.

Regular prices on Kingsford are $10 for an 18.6 lb bag of charcoal which comes to .537 cents per lb.

For comparisons sake I’ll do the math for you.

Home Depot Kingsford Sale 2×18.6= 37.2lbs  $9.88 divided by 37.2lbs=.265 cents per lb

Lowes Royal Oak Briquettes Sale $4 divided 15.4lbs= .259 cents per lb

Lowes Kingsford Sale Same as HD- 2×18.6= 37.2lbs  $9.88 divided by 37.2lbs=.265 cents per lb

Also there are $15 off of $50 coupons out there on the internet for Lowes, so if you get that discount code and use it, you’d need to get 6 two packs.  That’s $59.28-$15 coupon = $44.28 12 bags x 18.6= 223.2 lbs  $44.28 divided by 223.28= .198 cents per lb

This from AZ Monsoon  on the http://www.weberkettleclub.com forum

Home Depot:
2 – 18.6 lb Kingsford Bags $9.88
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Kingsford-18-6-lb-Charcoal-Briquettes-2-Bag-4460031239/205796026

Lowes:
15.4 lb Royal Oak Briquettes $4.00
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Royal-Oak-15-4-lb-Charcoal-Briquettes/1000175405

royaloakfourth

2 – 18.6 lb Kingford Bags $9.88
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Kingsford-2-Pack-18-6-lb-Charcoal-Briquettes/50330065

kingsfordfourth

Stubbs 14 lb bag $2.00 off $7.99
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Stubb-s-Stubb-s-14-lb-Charcoal-Briquettes/1000239075

The Latest… A DR Code Green 2nd Generation @WeberGrills Performer

Our buddy Anthony Caturano At Tonno took the second SS Performer.  Immediately I had a empty pit in my stomach, without a Performer to cook on at the dock. Truth be told I really enjoy the restoration process and needed another project so I searched out another Performer looking for some love.

So this beautiful gem fell into my lap look at the bottom of this post:)

It’s a second generation Weber Performer.  Each of the Generations of the Performers have things I like about them.

The classic lines on the first generation Stainless Steel ones, the only performers to use stainless steel. (Here’s the performer Anthony took)

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The Black Frame on the second generation.(This is the first Performer I ever acquired)

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The Wheels on the third Generation.

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The Black Metal table on the fourth generation. (This is actually my 3rd gen with a 4th gen table.

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And here is the latest- The DR Code Green, should clean up nicely.  When the light comes I’ll test the gas assist to see if it’s working.  With or without the gas assist I love the functionality of the attached table and bin on the Performers.

The Before Pictures- DR Code Green Weber Performer

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#Porkribs 7/22/16 on the @WeberGrills Kettle with assistance from the Performer

Results

Obviously I love BBQ cooking.  I love the versatility and ease of using two kettles but if I were only going to own one it would have to be a Performer.  That cart just makes everything so simple and convenient.  Being able to rest your tray of prepped food of hold your remote thermometer sensor makes things so simple.  When you factor in the gas assist for starting your coals, to me, it’s a no-brainer to go with a Performer.

When you consider the fact that unlike gas grills , a Weber Kettle can easily last you over 20 years with the bare minimum of care and you divide out the cost of ownership over all those years, I’d recommend you buy a Performer every time.  It’s only a couple hundred more and when you think that you probably only get 5 years on average out of a gas grill, the Weber Performer Charcoal grill with gas-assist will outlast a gasser by 4 times as long.

Anyway here was my set-up for some pork ribs that went on at 7:41 AM to be ready for lunch!

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Snake method charcoal set-up with apple chunks and cherry chips. Ribs slathered with frenches yellow mustard and then rubbed with the Paul Prudhomme rub.  Wait til pit temps hit 225 and then toss the ribs on offset the coals.  Then let er rip.  The top vent wide open bottom vent wide open.  Because we are using the snake method, only a portion of the coals are hot at a time as it works it’s way around the bowl.

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Results:

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Chicken wings on the @WeberGrills kettle @CaptJoeLobster

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Using 80% full Weber Rapidfire chimney of KBB in the charcoal baskets situated in the middle of the kettle.  Placed the wings around the edges for indirect high heat cooking.  Vents wide open with a chunk of hickory over the coals.

We will check em in 30 minutes.

Here’s they are in all their crispy on the outside-juicy on the inside goodness!

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Live Smoke at www.northeastbbq.com Soy/Ginger/Yellow Cayenne Pepper Marinated Tuna Steaks

Follow along this morning at www.northeastbbq.com

Thanks to skipper Brian Higgins aboard the F/V Toby Ann we’ve got some beautiful tuna steaks to smoke up today.
Last night I trimmed them up and put out my ingredients for the overnight marinade and added two more ingredients: Fresh Ginger which I’d grate into the bowl and finely chopped up yellow Cayenne Pepper.
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The marinade consisted of-

A Bottle of Veri Veri Teriyaki Marinade and Sauce

A Turn In the Bowl of Chili Oil and Japanese Sesame Oil

A Very Generous Amount of Crushed Red Pepper Flakes (I like stuff spicy)

A Half a Tablespoon of Granulated Garlic

Tablespoon of Freshly Grated Ginger

I Finely Chopped  Yellow Cayenne Pepper

A Cup Of Light Brown Sugar

Here’s one of teh tuna steaks before i put them to bed sealed in Ziploc bags overnight.

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This morning virtually all of the liquid of the marinade got sucked up by the tuna and it turns the tuna almost candied with the soy and the brown sugar getting all sucked up inside the flesh.

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5:15 AM Lay out the tuna on the Weber Smokey Mountain racks to dry.

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6:45AM Set up the smoker using the snake method apple wood chunks and cherry wood chips dispersed along the fuse.

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Lit 8 briquettes in the chimney and dumped them onto the left hand side of the charcoal fuse.

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8:00AM Update: Tuna steaks are cranking along but pit temps aren’t climbing the way it was the last time I smoked tuna.  Pit temp 165 at grate level one hour into the smoke. I opened the feeder door to let some air in and added some cherry chips to stoke the coals a bit.

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9:00AM Update:

Tuna internal temp 150 degrees and they come off.  I take the tuna steaks off and place them on the cool grates of the Weber kettle to dry.

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9:45 Tuna dried and ready to package:

 

You thought you didn’t like brussel sprouts til you roasted them on the @STOKGrills Charcoal Drum Using Their wok insert

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I never thought I liked brussel sprouts but we were doing mushroom swiss burgers with sauteed onions and I was looking for a side.  At Stop and Shop in East Gloucester they had brussel sprouts on sale for $2 a bag so I figured I could do something with them on the grill.

I never thought I’d have such a passion for BBQ Charcoal grilling but this grill with all the different inserts and the cast iron grates and the ash catching system at the bottom and the figuring out how to arrange your coals, it’s just straight up addicting. The process just takes you away and while I can’t imagine why some people like to golf, I imagine it’s the same type of thing- that you immerse yourself in the process and the stresses of every day life go away because you need to be focused.   It’s been a joy and the thing that takes the STOK grill system to the next level is all the cool inserts that you can use to try different types of cooking with wood chunks, chips and/or charcoal.

Anyway, preparing and roasting the brussel sprouts couldn’t be easier.

You wash them under cold water and dry them, cut them in half length-wise drizzle them with Atlantic Saltworks coarse salt, crushed black pepper and some garlic powder and place them cut side down on the wok insert or if you don’t have the wok insert , a good seasoned cast iron pan will do.  Get the grill up to 400 degrees and move them around a little as you cook.   About 15 minutes and they’ll bring out that sweet caramelizing  from the heat.   If you didn’t think you liked brussel sprouts, you really ought to give them a try this way.

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